Apple Computer Inc. (Cupertino, Calif.)

The story of Apple has a simple beginning: Steve Wozniak (Woz) designs and builds a complete, inexpensive microcomputer in a Los Altos, Calif., garage. His friend Steve Jobs sees its potential and convinces Woz to found a company to sell his creation.

That computer, now called the Apple 1, caused a small sensation when demonstrated at a Homebrew Computer Club meeting in 1975. The people who requested schematics at that meeting might be considered the first customers of Apple Computer, even though the company would not officially form until April 1976. Apple would go on to be one of the most successful microcomputer companies ever.

Only 200 Apple 1 systems were built by Apple, but it formed the basis for the hugely popular Apple II line. (presumably some were built by hobbyists from schematics distributed through the Homebrew Computer Club, but no known examples exist.) What made the Apple 1 interesting to hobbyists was its simplicity (fewer than 40 chips on the motherboard), its ability to run BASIC, and the fact that it was a complete, inexpensive computer on a single board. Very few Apple-built Apple 1 systems are known to exist, and if a Holy Grail of vintage computing exists, the Apple 1 is it.

Apple II

The earliest Apple IIs had gold ceramic Mostek memory chips and a white ceramic keyboard ROM. For fiscal 1978, Apple sold only 7,600 of the original Apple II computers and 35,100 more in 1979. Things picked up after that, as sales for all Apple II series systems reached 2 million in November 1984. In 1981, Apple created the Family System, an Apple II+ with a floppy disk drive, joysticks, and a set of games and home productivity software. The Apple+ had an updated ROM with an enhanced Applesoft BASIC and system software.

The Apple IIe (for “enhanced”) offered both upper- and lowercase characters and an expanded keyboard. Apple called the IIe the most extensive upgrade of the II line at the time. (There had been 13 major and minor revisions up to that point.) The circuitry was redesigned to use a quarter of the components found in the II+. In early 1987, Apple released a modest update of the IIe that featured an expanded keyboard with keypad and the same platinum-colored case as other Apple systems.

The Apple II, Apple II Plus, and Apple IIe designs were widely copied by other manufacturers. Some like the Franklin Ace series and the Video Technology Laser 128 systems are well known and collectible. Others are more obscure and include the Dick Smith Cat, Eurocon II, Microdigital TK3000 IIe, Orange, and Unitron U2200. All but the Laser 128 used illegally copied Apple system ROMs. Video Technology reverse-engineered the ROMs and was spared the legal trouble other clone makers faced.

Some people collect Apple clones, but their value is limited. Asian factories churned out clones under many brands with a form factor similar to the Apple systems. Most were poorly made and have little collector value. Better-made systems such as the Micro II, Microcom, and Syscom brands are more valued. Some clones including the CHE-1, Basis 108, and Spartan feature interesting designs or offer technical improvements over the Apple computers. These are valued slightly higher than other Apple II clones.

The Apple IIc was introduced as a “transportable” computer. Although small and with a handle, the IIc does not have as standard equipment an LCD screen usually associated with portable computers. It requires a separate CRT display or TV. Apple did offer an optional 24-line by 80-column LCD in late 1984, however. The IIc was based on the Snow White design, and Apple enlisted the famed frogdesign studio to help create it. In September 1986, Apple introduced an enhanced version of the IIc that could accept up to 1MB of additional RAM. Owners of earlier IIcs could upgrade their systems to take advantage of the extra memory.

The Apple IIGS was the last hurrah for the Apple II line, and it offered much greater performance and more expansion options. It was compatible with nearly all Apple IIe software and hardware, and offered a graphical interface similar to the Mac’s. A synthesizer chip was built into the system for more sophisticated sound capabilities. Two new graphics modes were available: 640 x 200 and 320 x 200 pixels, both with a palette of 4,096 colors. A limited run Woz Edition Apple IIGS will bring a premium price today, especially with its original authenticity papers.

ROM version of the Apple IIGS can make a difference in terms of value. The ROM 1 version is considered the least desirable by some, but it gives you the greatest backwards compatibility with older Apple II software. ROM 3, on the other hand, has fewer bugs than ROM 1 and is more sought after by some people.

Apple discontinued the last of the II line in December 1992, but continued to sell the Apple IIe into 1993.

Apple III

As the II line was establishing itself, Apple decided that it needed a more business-oriented offering. In 1978, the company began development of a new system, code-named Sara, that would become the Apple III. It was designed for and marketed to professionals and small businesses, and Apple supported it with a line of business applications and programming tools. It could, however, run most Apple II software in an emulation mode. Apple improved Apple III performance and reliability in late 1981. In 1983, Apple offered an Apple III Business System configuration that included the Monitor III, ProFile 5MB hard disk drive, 256K of RAM, and a software suite for $5,330. At the end of 1983, Apple offered an enhanced version of the Apple III Business System called the Apple III Plus.  The most significant improvement that the Apple III Plus made  is the addition of an interlace video mode, which doubled screen resolution.

Apple Lisa

The Apple III did not sell as well as the company had hoped, but it had started development of another business-focused system at the same time as the Apple III that would not reach market until 1983. The Lisa was a radically different (and more expensive) computer aimed at the business market.

Officially, Apple claimed that “Lisa” is an acronym that stands for Local Integrated Software Architecture. Legend has it, though, that the computer was named after either Steve Jobs’s daughter or the daughter of one of the engineers, but the true inspiration for the name has never been confirmed. Andy Hertzfeld, one of the creators of the Macintosh, says in his book, “Revolution in the Valley,” that the acronym explanation may have been invented after the fact in response to press queries about the name’s origin.

The original Lisa, referred to as the Lisa 1 by collectors, was technologically innovative, but a commercial failure for Apple. It popularized the concept of the GUI (graphical user interface) and could perform pre-emptive multitasking, meaning it could run multiple programs at once. However, it was overpriced and lacked adequate software and hardware support. Apple was able to make lemonade out of lemons by using lessons learned from the Lisa development on the Macintosh, one of the most successful microcomputers ever made.

Faced with resistance to the Lisa 1’s price, Apple unbundled the six business applications from the system in September 1983 and dropped the price by $3,000 to $6,995. Lisa 1s, especially unmodified early models, are highly sought after today. Finding complete working units is difficult. For example, the original Twiggy floppy disk drives were notoriously unreliable and were often replaced with third-party drives. (Apple intended to use the Twiggy drives for the Macintosh as well, but the reliability issues forced them to use more expensive Sony 3.5-inch floppies.) A Lisa with working Twiggy floppy drives will command a premium.

Launched with the Macintosh, the Lisa 2 came in three versions: The Lisa 2, Lisa 2/5, and Lisa 2/10. The 2/5 came with an external ProFile hard disk drive, and the 2/10 had an internal 10 MB hard disk drive. In early 1985, Apple renamed the Lisa 2/10 the Macintosh XL, a move that marked the end of the Lisa line. The Mac XL itself was discontinued in April 1985. Apple referred to the Lisa 2 and Macintosh series as Apple 32 SuperMicros.

Apple Macintosh

In 1984, Apple introduced the Macintosh series, which would eventually acquire a cult following. The Mac vs. PC religious wars persist to this day, started no doubt by the infamous “1984” TV ad that launched the Macintosh. Many current and former Mac users hold the original model in great reverence.

The obvious difference between the Macintosh and the computer it was intended to compete with, the IBM PC, was its GUI. It was the first computer designed around a graphical interface, and a great deal of effort went into not just the technology, but the design–how it looked and behaved from the user perspective. Steve Jobs reportedly considered the Mac a work of art and managed its development team with that mindset.

And the technology advances made by the Mac development team enabled them to make the artistic vision work. The original Mac specifications called for an 8-bit Motorola 6809E microprocessor. It quickly became clear to the development team that this design would limit memory and performance, and therefore be soon obsolete. Using a 16-bit Motorola 68000 microprocessor like that used in the Apple Lisa made more sense, but the designers had to be innovative to keep costs down and enable the graphics-intensive software they were developing for the Mac.

One of the most significant innovations was using PAL chips to allow the 68000 microprocessor to use an 8-bit memory bus. This simplified the design and reduced the number of RAM chips required.

In some ways, the original Macintosh is the ultimate collectible microcomputer. It is a milestone system in every sense of the word. Most important, the Mac developed a devoted following–sometimes obsessively so. Early models are hard to come by, especially in good unaltered condition. The cases are often discolored, cracked, or damaged by prying tools used for repairs or upgrades. The keyboard or mouse is usually missing, as are the system software disks and manuals. Pristine, complete examples are uncommon and command a high price.

Despite capturing the public’s attention and strong initial demand, Mac sales slowed after a few months on the market. The main reasons for this were its price and memory and storage limitations. The Mac 512K was a modest first upgrade to the original model. The additional memory helped with performance and allowed the development of more sophisticated software. Mac 128K systems were labeled as such after the 512K was introduced. The 512K Enhanced Mac replaced the 512K in April 1986. It had a double-density disk drive and improved system ROMs.

Apple’s next major Mac revision was the Plus, which had a SCSI port and could accommodate up to 4MB RAM. Apple sold upgrade kits (essentially a replacement motherboard) for previous compact Mac models to bring them up to the Mac Plus level. Mac XL and Lisa 1 owners could trade in their systems for a Mac Plus. Apple also unbundled the MacWrite and MacPaint applications for the Plus and 512K Enhanced models, selling them separately for $125 each. The Plus was sold for four years and is one of the most common models found today.

The SE extended the lifespan of the original compact Mac design through expandability and better performance, especially in hard disk access times. The SE/30 then boosted performance even further, claiming as much as four times the speed of the Mac SE. The SE stands for System Expansion. The SE and SE/30 used the same design as the Macintosh Plus, but provided a slot to extend the system and an additional bay for a disk drive. SE owners could upgrade their systems to a Mac SE/30 with a kit (another motherboard replacement) from Apple. A platinum case replaced the cream color of older Macs, but it is just as prone to discoloration. The SE and SE/30 were well supported by third-party communications, graphics, and other hardware manufacturers.

In 1990, Apple would again update the original Mac form factor with the Macintosh Classic. It was little changed from the SE, but it was the first Mac sold for less than $1,000. The Macintosh Classic II followed in 1991, and it was a significant upgrade with a 68030 CPU and twice the standard RAM.

The Macintosh II revitalized the Macintosh line with a more powerful CPU, six expansion slots, and color video. With greater on-board memory capacity, the Mac II could be beefed up for graphics-intensive applications such as desktop publishing or computer-aided design.  A number of third-party vendors produced accelerator boards–essentially processor upgrades–for the Mac II line, and they are desirable add-ons for enthusiasts today. In general, the more working expansion boards you find in an old Mac II, the better.

A lot of people thought that the Mac IIci and IIfx were overpriced when new, but everybody wanted one. The IIci boasted a 55 percent performance boost over its predecessors and could use higher capacity memory chips for a maximum 32MB of RAM. Today, you can get a good working unit with a monitor for well under $100–a deal especially considering that these machines are compatible enough and powerful enough for most of your everyday computing needs. This Mac IIsi was a cheaper, smaller version of the IIci.

The Macintosh IIfx provided a twofold increase in performance over the IIci. Apple introduced a number of high-end graphics options for the Macintosh at the same time as the IIfx. The most powerful was the Macintosh Display Card 8*24 GC, which offered high-speed graphics and 24-bit color. Values for the IIfx are higher than for some of its contemporary Mac models because it remains a productive system today, especially if it contains processor and graphics upgrades.

A year after the Macintosh IIfx came the Quadra series. Both models, the Quadra 700 and the Quadra 900, used the 68040 CPU and came in tower cases. They represented the highest-performance systems that Apple offered at the time, and they were capable of networking not only through a LocalTalk connection, but Ethernet as well.

Apple revamped its Macintosh line in 1997 with the PowerMac line on the high-performance side. The iMac was introduced the following year as the new low-end line. Both systems were based on the Motorola G3 processors.

The second generation of the iMac came in 2002 with the G4-based models. The iMac G4 was markedly different from the original iMac. The computer was housed in a semi-spherical pedestal that also served as the mount for the monitor. The G4 systems were also the first to use the UNIX-based Mac OS X operating system. OS X was advertised as “crash-proof and secure.”

Apple didn’t have a true portable until the Macintosh Portable in 1989. Smaller than most luggables but still too big to be a laptop, the Portable was a “hate it” or “love it” system. Detractors said it was too expensive, big, and heavy. The use of a lead acid battery–an unusual choice–added heft and bulk to the system, but provided great battery life of between five and 10 hours. Be careful to check the battery compartment when purchasing a Mac Portable that has been unused in a long time. The lead acid battery might have leaked and damaged the unit. Also, the optional keypad took the place of the trackball. Later models had a backlit LCD and are the more desireable systems.

Fans of the Portable liked the fact that it sacrificed little functionality over the desktop Mac models. In fact, the Mac Portable is a comfortable and capable machine, but Apple would not have a successful portable until it launched its PowerBook line in 1991.

Where the Portable faced mixed reviews, the Macintosh PowerBook 100 was an instant hit. The well-known Mac interface in a notebook form factor was a strong enough combination to convert more than a few PC users. Apple quickly followed the PowerBook 100 with two 68030 systems, the PowerBook 140 and the PowerBook 170. These PowerBooks also used Ni-Cad batteries, a welcome change from the lead-acid batteries in the PowerBook 100.

Apple I (1976, early micro)
Original Retail Price: $666.66
Base Configuration: 6502 CPU, 8K RAM, BASIC, power supply
Size/Weight: 6 x 8 inches (motherboard)
Important Options: keyboard, monochrome monitor, dual transformers

Apple II/Apple II Plus (June 1977 [Apple II]/June 1979 [Apple II Plus], Apple II-class desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,298 to $2,638 (Apple II)/$1,330 (Apple II Plus)
Base Configuration: 1MHz 6502 CPU, eight expansion slots, 16K RAM (48K max), 8K ROM (12K max), composite video port, integral keyboard, game and cassette ports, BASIC (Apple II Plus)
Video: 24-line x 40-column text, 280 x 160 graphics, 15 colors
Important Options: lowercase upgrade, color monitor, external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, serial interface, Silentype printer, game controllers, modem

Apple IIe (Jan. 1983, Apple II-class desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,395 to $1,995
Base Configuration: 6502A CPU, seven expansion slots, 64K RAM (128K max), 16K ROM, integral keyboard, Applesoft BASIC in ROM, owner’s manual
Video: 40-column text
Important Options: ProDOS, external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, 80-column card, 12-inch Apple II monochrome monitor, mouse

 

Apple IIe "Platinum"

Apple IIe “Platinum”

Apple IIe “Platinum” (Jan. 1987, Apple II-class desktop)
Original Retail Price: $829
Base Configuration: 6502 CPU, 8 expansion slots, 128K RAM (1.2MB max), 16K ROM,  integral keyboard with keypad, Applesoft BASIC in ROM, built-in speaker, owner’s manual
Video: 40- or 80-column text, 16 colors
Size/Weight: 4.5h x 15.13w x 18d inches, 12 lbs.
Important Options: external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, Apple IIGS upgrade kit

 

Apple IIc

Apple IIc

Apple IIc (April 1984, Apple II-class desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$1,295
Base Configuration: 1.02MHz 65C02 CPU; ProDOS; 128K (1.1MB max); 16K ROM (32K max); 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; integral keyboard; two serial, RCA video, headphone, mouse, and game ports; owner’s manual on disk; setup and system utilities manuals
Video: 24-line x 80-column text, 560 x 192 graphics, 16 colors
Size/Weight: 2.5 x 12 x 11.5 inches, 7.5 lbs.
Important Options: external floppy disk drive; 9-inch monochrome, composite, or RGB monitor; RF modulator; LCD; mouse; AppleWorks 2.0; Scribe or ImageWriter printer; joysticks; modem; carrying case

 

Apple IIGS

Apple IIGS

Apple IIGS  (Sept. 1986, Apple II-class desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$999
Base Configuration: 2.8MHz 65C816; ProDOS 16; seven slots; 256K RAM (8MB max); 128K ROM (1MB max); 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; NTSC, composite, and RGB video interfaces; keyboard/keypad; SmartPort; two serial and one game port; mouse; setup guide; owner’s, AppleSoft BASIC, and system disk manuals; ProDOS training disk
Video: 640 x 200 graphics, 16 colors
Important Options: LaserWriter or ImageWriter printer

 

Apple III

Apple III

Apple III/Apple III Plus (May 1980 [Apple III]/Dec. 1983 [Apple III Plus], desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$4,340 to $7,800 (Apple III)/$2,995 (Apple III Plus)
Base Configuration: 1.8MHz 6502A CPU; Sophisticated Operating System (SOS); four slots; 128K RAM (256K max); 4K ROM; 5.25-inch floppy disk drives; NTSC video interface; integral keyboard/keypad; RS-232C, printer, and two game ports; Apple II emulation and utilities disks; Business BASIC; Pascal; SOS and owner’s manuals
Video: 24-line x 80-character text, 560 x 192 graphics, 16 colors
Important Options:external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, 5MB ProFile hard disk drive, Monitor III CRT display, Silentype printer, Apple Daisy-Wheel printer (Apple III Plus)

 

Apple Lisa with ProFile hard drive

Apple Lisa with ProFile hard drive

Apple Lisa (Jan. 1983, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$9,995
Base Configuration: 68000 CPU, three slots, 1MB RAM, two 5.25-inch floppy disk drives (“Twiggy” drives), integral 12-inch monochrome monitor, keyboard/keypad, mouse, two serial and one parallel port, application suite
Video: 40-line x 132-column text, 720 x 364 graphics
Important Options: CP/M or Xenix, external 5MB ProFile hard disk drive, dot-matrix or daisy-wheel printer

 

Launched at the same time, the Apple Lisa 2 and Apple Macintosh were part of the Apple 32 Supermicro System family

Launched at the same time, the Apple Lisa 2 and Apple Macintosh were part of the Apple 32 Supermicro System family

Apple Lisa 2/Macintosh XL (Jan. 1984, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$3,495 to $5,495
Base Configuration: 5MHz 68000 CPU, three AppleBus slots, 512K RAM (1MB max), 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, integral 12-inch monochrome CRT, keyboard/keypad, mouse, two serial and one parallel port
Video: 720 x 364 graphics Size/Weight: 13.8 x 18.7 x 15.2, 48 lbs.
Important Options:CP/M or Xenix, 5MB or 10MB ProFile hard disk drive, two-port parallel interface, Lisa 7/7 application suite

 

The Apple Macintosh with accessories available at launch

The Apple Macintosh with accessories available at launch

Apple Macintosh/Macintosh 512K (Jan. 1984 [Macintosh]/Sept. 1984 [Macintosh 512K], desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$2,495 (Macintosh)/$3,195 (Macintosh 512K)
Base Configuration: 7.83MHz 68000 CPU, system software in ROM, 128K RAM (512K max) and 64K ROM, 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, integral 9-inch monochrome CRT, keyboard, mouse, two RS-232C/RS-422 ports, guided tour on disk, owner’s manual
Video: 512 x 342 graphics
Sound: 4-voice sound with 8-bit D/A conversion
Size/Weight: 9.75 x 9.75 x 13.5 inches, 22.7 lbs.
Important Options:external 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, keypad, ImageWriter printer, carrying case, modem

 

Rear view of the Apple Macintosh Plus

Rear view of the Apple Macintosh Plus

Apple Macintosh Plus (Jan. 1986, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$2,599 to $4,098
Base Configuration: 7.83MHz 68000 CPU, Macintosh System Software, 1MB RAM (4MB max), 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, 9-inch integral monochrome CRT display, keyboard/keypad, mouse, 2 serial and 1 SCSI port
Video: 512 x 342 graphics
Size/Weight: 13.5 x 9.5 x 11 inches, 16.5 lbs.
Sound: 4-voice sound
Important Options: 20MB hard disk drive, ImageWriter or LaserWriter printer

Apple Macintosh SE (March 1987, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $2,898 to $3,698
Base Configuration: 68000 CPU; System Software; SE-Bus slot; 1MB RAM (4MB max), 256K ROM; one or two 3.5-inch floppy disk drives; keyboard/keypad; SCSI, ADB, two RS-422, and sound ports
Video: 512 x 342 graphics
Size/Weight: 13.6 x 9.69 x 10.9 inches
Important Options: 20MB hard disk drive (SE)

 

Apple Macintosh SE/30

Apple Macintosh SE/30

Apple Macintosh SE/30 (Jan. 1989, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$4,369 to $6,569
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68030 CPU, System Software 6.0.3, 030 Direct Slot, 1MB RAM (8MB max), 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, keyboard/keypad, SCSI port, AppleTalk and HyperCard software
Video: 512 x 342 graphics
Size/Weight: 13.6 x 9.69 x 10.9 inches
Important Options: 40MB or 80MB hard disk drive

Apple Macintosh Classic (1990, desktop)
Base Configuration (SE): 8MHz 68000 CPU; System Software; 1MB RAM (4MB max), 256K ROM; SuperDrive floppy drive; built-in 9-inch monochrome monitor; keyboard/keypad; SCSI, ADB, two RS-422, and sound ports
Video:
512 x 342 graphics
Important Options: 40MB hard disk drive

 

Apple Macintosh Classic II

Apple Macintosh Classic II

Apple Macintosh Classic II (October 1991, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$1,899
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68030 CPU, 2MB RAM (10MB max), 40MB hard drive, 3.5-inch floppy drive, SCSI port, ADB port, sound output, keyboard, mouse, System 7.0.1, Hypercard 2.1
Important Options: 80MB hard drive

 

Apple Macintosh II

Apple Macintosh II

Apple Macintosh II (May 1987, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$3,898 to $5,498
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68020; System Software with Multifinder; six NuBus slots; 1MB RAM (8MB max); 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; keyboard/keypad; SCSI, two RS-422, sound, and ADB ports; AppleTalk and HyperCard software
Video: 640 x 480 graphics, eight colors
Size/Weight: 5.5 x 18.7 x 14.5 inches, 24 lbs.
Important Options:A/UX, 40MB hard disk drive, graphics upgrade, 12-inch monochrome or 13-inch RGB monitor, laser printer

 

Apple Macintosh IIx

Apple Macintosh IIx

Apple Macintosh IIx (Sept. 1988, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$9,300
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68030 CPU, System Software 6.0.2, six NuBus slots, 4MB RAM (8 max), 256K ROM, 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, 2 serial ports, 2 ADB ports, SCSI port, sound port, MultiFinder
Size/Weight: 5.5 x 18.7 x 14.5 inches, 24 lbs.
Important Options: 80MB hard drive, A/UX

 

Apple Macintosh IIcx

Apple Macintosh IIcx

Apple Macintosh IIcx (March 1989, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$4,669 to $7,552
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68030 CPU; System Software 6.0.3; three NuBus slots; 1MB RAM (8MB max), 256K ROM; 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, keyboard/keypad; SCSI, two RS-232/422, two ADB, and sound ports; AppleTalk and HyperCard software
Video: 640 x 480 graphics, eight colors
Size/Weight: 5.5 x 11.9 x 14.4 inches, 14 lbs.
Important Options:A/UX, 40MB or 80MB hard disk drive, graphics upgrade, 12-inch monochrome or 13-inch RGB monitor, laser printer

 

Apple Macintosh IIci

Apple Macintosh IIci

Apple Macintosh IIci (Sept. 1989, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$6,269 to $9,152
Base Configuration:25MHz 68030 CPU; System Software 6.0.4; three NuBus slots; 1MB RAM (32MB max); 512K ROM; 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; RGB or monochrome monitor; keyboard/keypad; mouse; SCSI port; AppleTalk and HyperCard software
Video: 640 x 480 graphics, 256 colors
Size/Weight: 5.5 x 11.9 x 14.5 inches, 16 lbs.
Important Options:A/UX, 40MB or 80MB hard disk drive, LaserWriter printer

Apple Macintosh IIsi (1990, desktop)
Base Configuration: 20MHz 68030 CPU; System Software 6.0.4; NuBus slot; 3MB RAM (17MB max); 512K ROM; SuperDrive floppy disk drive; RGB or monochrome monitor; keyboard/keypad; mouse; SCSI port; AppleTalk and HyperCard software
Video: 640 x 480 graphics, 256 colors
Important Options:A/UX, 40MB or 80MB hard disk drive, LaserWriter printer

 

Apple Macintosh LC

Apple Macintosh LC

Apple Macintosh LC (1990, desktop)
Base Configuration:
16MHz 68020 CPU, 2mB RAM (10MB max), 512K ROM, SuperDrive floppy drive, 40MB SCSI hard drive, ADB port, keyboard, mouse, 2 serial ports, expansion slot, sound input and output ports, microphone
Size/Weight: 3h x 12.2w x 15d inches, 8.8 lbs.
Important Options: external hard drive; Apple IIe card; 12-inch RGB, 12-inch monochrome, or AppleColor High-Resolution RGB monitor

Apple Macintosh IIfx (March 1990, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $8,969 to $10,969
Base Configuration: 40MHz 68030 CPU; System Software 6.0.5; six NuBus slots; Processor Direct Slot; 4MB RAM (128MB max); 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; keyboard/keypad; SCSI and ADB ports; AppleTalk and HyperCard softwre
Size/Weight: 5.5 x 18.7 x 14.5 inches, 24 lbs.
Important Options: A/UX, 80MB to 160MB hard disk drive, Macintosh Display Card 8*24 GC, LaserWriter printer

 

Apple Macintosh Quadra 700

Apple Macintosh Quadra 700

Apple Macintosh Quadra 700 (October 1991, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$5,699
Base Configuration: 25MHz 68040 CPU, 4MB RAM (20MB max), 512K VRAM (2MB max), 80MB hard drive, 1.4MB floppy drive, 2 ADB and 2 serial ports, SCSI interface, stereo and mono sound ports, 2 NuBus slots and 1 Processor Direct slot, Ethernet connector, keyboard, mouse, microphone, System 7
Size/Weight: 11.9h x 5.5w x 14.4d inches, 13 lbs 10 oz.
Important Options:160MB or 400MB hard drive, any Apple monitor

 

Apple Macintosh Quadra 900

Apple Macintosh Quadra 900

Apple Macintosh Quadra 900 (October 1991, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$7,199
Base Configuration: 25MHz 68040 CPU, 4MB RAM (64MB max), 1MB VRAM (2MB max), 1.4MB floppy drive, 1 ADB and 2 serial ports, SCSI interface, stereo and mono sound ports, 5 NuBus slots and 1 Processor Direct slot, Ethernet connector, keyboard, mouse, microphone, System 7
Size/Weight: 18.6h x 8.9w x 20.6d inches, 36.75 lbs
Important Options:160MB or 400MB hard drive, any Apple monitor

Apple Workgroup Server 80 (1993, multi-user system)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68040 CPU, 33MHz FPU, 8MB RAM (136MB max), 512K VRAM (1MB max), SuperDrive floppy drive, 3 storage bays, 3 NuBus slots, 68040 Processor Direct slot, 2 serial ports, sound input/output port, keyboard, mouse,  System 7, AppleShare 4.0, AppleTalk, Ethernet
Video: up to 32,768 colors
Size/Weight: 14.25h x 8.9w x 16d inches, 25.3 lbs.
Important Options: 100MB hard drive, CD-ROM drive, tape drive, all Apple displays

 

Apple iMac G4

Apple iMac G4

Apple iMac G4 (2002, desktop)
Original Retail Price:
$1,299 to $1,799
Base Configuration:700MHz G4 CPU, 128MB RAM, 40GB hard drive, CD-RW drive, 15-inch active-matrix LCD color monitor, internal speaker, keyboard, mouse
Important Options: 800MHz G4 CPU, 256MB RAM, DVD drive, 60GB hard drive, Apple Pro speakers

 

Apple Macintosh Portable

Apple Macintosh Portable

Apple Macintosh Portable (Sept. 1989, transportable)
Original Retail Price:
$5,799 to $6,499
Base Configuration: 16MHz CMOS 68000, System Software 6.0.4, Processor Direct Slot, 1MB RAM, 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, monochrome LCD, integral keyboard with trackball, mouse, two serial and one LocalTalk port, HyperCard, lead-acid battery, AC adapter
Video: 640 x 480 graphics
Size/Weight: 15.7 lbs.
Important Options: 40MB hard disk drive, keypad, modem

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 100 (1991, notebook)
Original Retail Price: $2,500
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68000 CPU, MacOS, 4MB RAM (8MB max), 256K ROM, external 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, 20MB hard disk drive, 9-inch monochrome LCD, integral keyboard and trackball, lead-acid battery, AC adapter
Size/Weight: 1.8 x 11 x 8.5 inches, 5.1 lbs.
Important Options: 40- or 80MB hard disk drive, internal modem, HDI-20 external floppy drive, HDI-30 SCSI adapter

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 140 (1991, notebook)
Original Retail Price: $2,899
Base Configuration: 16MHz 68030 CPU, MacOS, 2MB RAM (8MB max), 256K ROM, external 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, 20MB hard disk drive, 10-inch monochrome LCD, integral keyboard and trackball,  1 ADB and 2 serial ports, SCSI port, sound input and output ports, Ni-Cad battery, AC adapter
Video: 640 x 400 pixels
Sound: 8-bit sound chip
Size/Weight: 2.25h x 11.25w x 9.3d inches, 6.8 lbs.
Important Options: 40- or 80MB hard disk drive, internal modem, HDI-20 external floppy drive, HDI-30 SCSI adapter

The Apple Macintosh Powerbook 100, Powerbook 140, and Powerbook 170

The Apple PowerBook 100, PowerBook 140, and PowerBook 170

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 170 (1991, notebook)
Original Retail Price: $4,599
Base Configuration: 25MHz 68030 CPU, 25MHz 68882 FPU, MacOS, 4MB RAM (8MB max), 256K ROM, external 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, 40MB hard disk drive, 10-inch monochrome LCD, integral keyboard and trackball, 1 ADB and 2 serial ports, SCSI port, sound input and output ports, Ni-Cad battery, internal modem AC adapter, System 7.0.1
Video: 640 x 400 pixels
Sound: 8-bit sound chip
Size/Weight: 2.25h x 11.25w x 9.3d inches, 6.8 lbs.
Important Options: 80MB hard disk drive, internal modem, HDI-20 external floppy drive, HDI-30 SCSI adapter

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 145 (1992, notebook)

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 160 (1992, notebook)

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 180 (1992, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030 CPU, 68882 FPU, 4MB RAM (14MB max), SuperDrive floppy drive, 80MB hard drive, 10-inch backlit supertwist grey-scale LCD, NiCad battery, ADB and 2 serial ports, sound input and output ports, video output port, SCSI port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels, 16-level grey scale
Size/Weight: 6.8 lbs.
Important Options: 160MB hard drive, modem or fax/data modem

Apple Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210 (1992, notebook)

Apple Macintosh PowerBook Duo 230 (1992, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030, 4MB RAM (24MB max), 80MB hard drive, 9-inch backlit supertwist grey-scale LCD, nickel-metal-hydride battery, serial port, modem port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels, 16-level grey scale
Size/Weight: 1.4h x 10.9w x 8,5d inches, 4.2 lbs.
Important Options: 120MB or 160MB hard drive, external SuperDrive floppy drive, modem, PowerBook Duo MiniDock, PowerBook Duo Dock

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 145b (1993, notebook)
Base Configuration: 25MHz 68030 CPU, 4MB RAM (8MB max), SuperDrive floppy drive, 40MB hard drive, 10-inch monochrome backlit supertwist LCD. NiCad battery, 2 serial and one ADB ports, sound input and output ports, SCSI port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels
Size/Weight: 6.8 lbs.
Important Options: 80MB hard drive, fax/data modem

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 160 (1993, notebook)

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 165 (1993, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030 CPU, 4MB RAM (14MB max), SuperDrive floppy drive, 80MB hard drive, 10-inch backlit supertwist grey-scale LCD, NiCad battery, ADB and 2 serial ports, sound input and output ports, video output port, SCSI port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels, 16-level grey scale
Size/Weight: 6.8 lbs.
Important Options: 160MB hard drive, modem or fax/data modem

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 165c (1993, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030 CPU, 68882 FPU, 4MB RAM (14MB max), SuperDrive floppy drive, 80MB hard drive, 9-inch backlit supertwist color LCD, NiCad battery, ADB and 2 serial ports, sound input and output ports, video output port, SCSI port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels, 256 colors
Size/Weight: 7 lbs.
Important Options: 160MB hard drive, modem or fax/data modem

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 180C (1993, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030 CPU, 68882 FPU, 4MB RAM (14MB max), SuperDrive floppy drive, 80MB hard drive, 8.4-inch backlit supertwist color LCD, NiCad battery, ADB and 2 serial ports, sound input and output ports, video output port, SCSI port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels, 256 colors
Size/Weight: 7.1 lbs.
Important Options: 160MB hard drive, modem or fax/data modem

Apple Macintosh Powerbook Duo 250 (1993, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030, 4MB RAM (24MB max), 200MB hard drive, 9-inch backlit supertwist grey-scale LCD, nickel-metal-hydride battery, serial port, modem port
Video: 640 x 400 pixels, 16-level grey scale
Size/Weight: 1.4h x 10.9w x 8,5d inches, 4.2 lbs.
Important Options: external SuperDrive floppy drive, modem, PowerBook Duo MiniDock, PowerBook Duo Dock

Apple Macintosh Powerbook Duo 270c (1993, notebook)
Base Configuration: 33MHz 68030 CPU, 68882 FPU, 4MB RAM (32MB max), 240MB hard drive, 8.4-inch backlit active-matrix display, nickel-metal-hydride battery, serial port, modem port
Video: 640 x 480 pixels, 256 colors
Size/Weight: 1.5w x 10.9w x 8.5d inches, 4.8 lbs.
Important Options: external SuperDrive floppy drive, modem, PowerBook Duo MiniDock, PowerBook Duo Dock

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 150 (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 520 (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 520c (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 540 (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 540c (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook Duo 280 (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook Duo 280c (1994, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 190 (1995, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 1400cs (1996, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 5300 (1996, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook Duo 2300c (1996, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook (1997, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook 3400c (1997, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook G3 “Kanga”  (1997, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook G3 “Wall Street” (1998, notebook)

Apple Macintosh Powerbook G3 “Lombard”  (1998, notebook)

Apple iBook (1999, laptop)

Apple Newton MessagePad OMP (1993, PDA)
Base Configuration: 20MHz ARM 610 CPU, 640K RAM, 4MB ROM, PCMCIA type 2 slot, LCD, LocalTalk port, stylus, alkaline or NiCad battery
Video: 336 x 240 pixels
Size/Weight: 7.25h x 4.5w x 0.75d inches, 0.9 lbs.
Important Options: fax modem, Newton Connection Kit, charging station, messaging card, plastic or leather carrying case, telescoping pen

Apple Newton MessagePad 100 (1994, PDA)
Original Retail Price: $499
Base Configuration: 20MHz ARM 610 CPU, 640K RAM, 4MB ROM, PCMCIA type 2 slot, LCD, LocalTalk port, stylus, alkaline or NiCad battery
Video: 336 x 240 pixels
Size/Weight: 7.25h x 4.5w x 0.75d inches, 0.9 lbs.
Important Options: fax modem, Newton Connection Kit, charging station, messaging card, plastic or leather carrying case, telescoping pen

Apple Newton MessagePad 110 (1994, PDA)
Original Retail Price: $599
Base Configuration: 20MHz ARM 610 CPU, 1MB RAM, 4MB ROM, PCMCIA type 2 slot, LCD, LocalTalk port, stylus, alkaline or NiCad battery
Video: 336 x 240 pixels
Size/Weight: 8h x 4w x 1.25d inches, 1.28 lbs.
Important Options: fax modem, Newton Connection Kit, charging station, messaging card, plastic or leather carrying case, telescoping pen

Apple Newton MessagePad 120 (1994, PDA)
Base Configuration: 20MHz ARM 610 CPU, 1MB or 2MB RAM, 4MB ROM, PCMCIA type 2 slot, LCD, LocalTalk port, telescoping pen, alkaline or NiCad battery
Video: 336 x 240 pixels
Size/Weight: 8h x 4w x 1.2d inches, 1 lb.
Important Options: fax modem, Newton Connection Kit, charging station, messaging card, plastic or leather carrying case

Apple Newton MessagePad 130 (1996, PDA)

Apple Newton MessagePad 2000 (1997, PDA)

Apple Newton MessagePad 2100 (1997, PDA)

Apple eMate 300 (1998, PDA)

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