Commodore Business Machines Inc. (West Chester, Pa.)

Parent company Commodore International was founded in 1958 as a Canadian marketer and assembler of typewriters and electromechanical business machines. In 1968, the company entered the electronic calculator market–one of the first to do so in the U.S.–and sold off its other interests. Commodore Business Machines was created in 1976 with the purchase of MOS Technology, a semiconductor manufacturer that developed the 6502 CPU used in many Apple, Commodore, and other computers.

The PET/CBM Series

Along with Tandy/Radio Shack and Apple Computer, Commodore was one of the first mass marketers of personal computers in 1977. In fact, its PET line outsold the Apple II until sometime in 1978. Commodore considered the PET (Programmable Educational Terminal) models as scientific and educational computers, and if you attended grade school in the late 1970s or early 1980s, you might have used one.

The PET’s integrated design appealed to schools, although Commodore never matched Apple’s educational presence. Chuck Peddle, who designed the 6502 processor in the PET, also designed the computer itself along with Leonard Tramiel, son of then-Commodore chairman Jack Tramiel. The earliest PETs had a closely spaced Chiclet-style keyboard and keypad, and they are the most prized finds by Commodore collectors. These early PETs have sold for $500 to $600 in excellent condition. The subsequent PET 2001 series came in three models: The PET 2001-8 had 8K RAM and a typewriter-style keyboard. The PET 2001-16N and 32N had 16K and 32K, respectively,  and a keypad and graphics keys on its large-style keyboard.

The PET 3000 was Commodore’s international designation for the PET 2000 series, although some sources indicate that there were minor differences in the two lines. By 1980, Commodore had sold 107,000 PETs. The optional floppy drives used by both the PET and CBM series had their own processors, which freed up system resources for other tasks.

The two models in the PET 4000 series were the PET 4016 with 16K of RAM and the 4032 with 32K of RAM. Based on the CBM 8032, the SuperPET was a high-end professional system. It offered dual-processing power and wide support for popular programming languages of the day. A few PET 64 systems were made with the Commodore 64 electronics in a PET housing.

The CBM 2001 was a renamed but improved PET 2001. Models 16B and 32B had 16K and 32K RAM, respectively. A CBM 8032 mode allowed it to run all 8032 software. A CBM 8096 model was identical to the 8032 but had 96K RAM.

The B Series

The intended successor to the PET/CBM lines was the so-called B series starting with the B128 and B256 (called the 600 and 700 series in Europe, respectively). Another similar model, the P128 (a.k.a. the P500), was developed around the same time but never officially released. Beta examples did make their way out into the public.

Enhanced versions of the B128 and B256, the BX128 and BX256, offered dual processors and more memory. The BX128 and BX256 were referred to as the 630 and 730, respectively, in Europe. Commodore positioned the BX series against the IBM PC and the Apple III. The Commodore 900 was a later attempt to break into the business market, but relatively few units were sold. The 900 was sold primarily in Europe.

The VIC-20 and Commodore 64 Series

The B series business systems sold poorly. Fortunately for Commodore, it was making waves in the home computer market with the VIC-20 and C64. The VIC referred to the Video Interface Chip at the heart of the VIC-20. It combined RAM, ROM, and video circuitry, reducing cost and complexity. The VIC-20 marked Commodore’s entry into the home computer market, and the system offered several nice features for the price. They include a full-size keyboard with four programmable function keys, a built-in RF modulator, and lowercase character display. The VIC-20 was sold as the VIC 1001 in Japan. Commodore sold its millionth VIC-20 by January 1983. They are common today, so be patient and wait for a complete working unit in good condition..

The 64 (also referred to as the C64) was Commodore’s answer to the Apple II+ and other home computers. With the optional IEEE-488 cartridge, the 64 could use CBM peripherals. Commodore sold 50,000 64s in the first five months it was available. By the time the 64C rolled out, nearly 6 million 64s had been sold–more than any other model of microcomputer at the time and since. Total sales of all 64 models is estimated to be more than 17 million worldwide.

The 64C features a new physical design similar to the 128, which was introduced earlier, with the same light beige color. The Graphics Environment Operating System (GEOS) provided a graphical, easier-to-use interface with the computer. GEOS also included a paint program and a word processing application.

One of the rarest 64-based system, The UltiMax, was aimed at the video game player and based on the C64 design. It had a custom graphics chip and nine-octave sound. Few UltiMax systems were sold, and they are among the most sought-after models by Commodore collectors. The system was introduced simultaneously with the C64 in Japan as the Max Machine. It was advertised in Germany as the VIC-10 and announced in the U.S., but apparently sold only in Japan.

In 1990 and 1991, Commodore developed a successor to the C64 called the C65. The company never sold it, but examples surfaced after 1994, the year Commodore went out of business. Apparently, another company acquired an unknown number of functioning beta or prototype units and resold them. C65s are rare and comparable in value to the UltiMax.

Originally introduced as the SX-64, the Executive 64 could run all C64 software, and the optional Z80 cartridge allowed it to use CP/M. The PET Emulator made the PET software library available. Far fewer of the C64-compatible Commodore portables were produced than their desktop counterparts, but they are not rare today. Nonetheless, clean working examples command over $100 as they are favorites among Commodore and portable enthusiasts.

Most 64, VIC-20, and other Commodore models share common peripherals such as the C1541, C1571, and C1581 floppy drives; Datasette cassette recorder; and various printer and monitor models. The model descriptions below provide details.

Short-Lived Phenomena

In 1984, Commodore announced a confusing array of new systems. All were similar to existing architecture, yet did not seem to offer much more value than the 64C or VIC-20. The 264 and V364 offered more colors, but had poorer sound and no sprite capability. Consequently, many VIC-20 and C64 programs had to be adapted before they would work on them. Needless to say, this shortcoming limited the available software and the appeal of the systems. Although a small number of 264 and a smaller number of V364 systems made it into the hands of consumers, these models are best described as prototypes.

The Plus/4 gets its name from its four built-in applications, each accessible by a keystroke. The concept wasn’t a hit with consumers, however, and the Plus/4 lived a short life. These systems often show up in good condition in their original boxes, which might reflect how useful their original owners considered them. The Commodore 16 fit somewhere between the VIC-20 and the Plus/4. A system similar to the 16, the Commodore 116, sold in Europe only.

The Commodore 128 introduced the following year was a different story. It was a success because it addressed a few obvious shortcomings of the 64. First, it provided twice the memory, and a better BASIC. It also improved the video for 80-column display, and it could run CP/M, making a much larger software library available. More than 600,000 128s were sold worldwide in its first year. The 128D had a built-in C1571 floppy drive and higher graphics resolution thanks to 64K of video RAM.

In early 1983, Commodore introduced the HHC-4 handheld computer. It was similar to other small systems from companies such as Radio Shack, Sharp, Toshiba, and Quasar that appeared around the same time. It was essentially a calculator with a small QWERTY keyboard that could run BASIC programs. It had a single-line, 24-character display and ran on standard AA batteries.

The Amiga Line

In 1984, Commodore bought a former joystick manufacturer that had designed a new computer called the Amiga-PC. That computer was to sell for $2,000 with its own graphical operating system and exceptional sound and graphics thanks to custom chipsets. It would also optionally run CP/M and MS-DOS. That design, with some changes, became the first Commodore Amiga–the 1000.

The Commodore Amiga set a new standard for graphics-based computing. Its custom graphics and sound chipsets were years ahead of what its competition offered, and remained so for some time. Amiga users are extremely loyal, and many Amiga clubs still provide support for the system. Commodore renamed the system the Amiga 1000 in 1987 when it launched the Amiga 2000 and 500 models.

Commodore launched the A500 in 1987 to better position itself in the home and education markets. It is a less expensive version of the A1000 in an integrated keyboard/CPU housing. An A500+ appeared in 1991 with 1MB RAM standard and an enhanced chipset, but it lasted only six months before the A600 replaced it. The A600 was smaller and lacked a keypad, but it was cheaper for Commodore to produce. The A600 was Commodore’s attempt at making a game machine with the Amiga architecture.

The A2000 in 1987 represented the first major upgrade to the Amiga line. In late 1989, Commodore introduced the A2630 accelerator board for the A2000 designed to boost video performance. It had a 25MHz 68030 processor and 2MB of RAM. The A2500 series used the A2000 motherboard with either the A2620 accelerator board with a 68020 CPU and a 68881 coprocessor.

With the A2500 and A3000, Commodore moved to much faster processors and provided more tools for users to take advantage of the Amiga’s multimedia capabilities. Many of the later Amigas are still used by multimedia, animation, and video production professionals.  Note that although the A3000 claims VGA and RGB video compatibility, it does not support all modes.

The last Amiga that Commodore produced was the A4000 in 1992. It had Motorola’s then-new 68040 processor, but Commodore introduced a 68030 version of the A4000 in the following year. A “T” suffix for the A3000 and A4000 lines (e.g., A3000T and A4000T) indicates the computer is in a tower case.

Particularly with the later high-end Amiga models, add-ons such as a 68060 accelerator board, high-performance graphics card, and a video editing subsystem can add significant value. For example, a heavily upgraded system that includes the popular Newtek Video Toaster editing system could add $1,000 to $2,000 to its value. In fact, upgrades such as video editing hardware or accelerator boards often sell for more than the computers themselves.

Like every other surviving computer maker, Commodore sold several PC-compatible models, including the PC10 in 1986 and the Commodore Colt in 1988. Both were undistinguished, me-too PC XT clones. If not for the Commodore name, the PC10 and Colt would have little collector interest.

Commodore PET 2001 Series (Oct. 1977, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $595
Base Configuration: 1MHz 6502 CPU, 4K RAM (32K max), 14K ROM, integral cassette recorder, integral 9-inch monochrome CRT, integral keyboard or keyboard/keypad, IEEE-488 port
Video: 25-line x 40-column text
Size/Weight: 17.5 x 19 x 15.5 inches, 37 lbs.
Important Options: CBM 2040 dual 5.25-inch floppy disk drives, CBM 2022 or 2023 printer

Commodore PET 4000 Series (1978, desktop)
Base Configuration: 6502 CPU, 16K RAM (32K max), 18K ROM, integral 12-inch monochrome CRT, integral keyboard/keypad, RS-232C and IEEE-488 ports, BASIC 4.0
Video: 25-line x 40-column text
Important Options: CBM 2031, 4040, 8050, or 8250 floppy disk drive; Datasette; CBM 4022, 8023P, or 8300P printer; CBM 8010 modem

Commodore PET 4016

Commodore PET 4016

Commodore SuperPET 9000 Series (1981, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,995
Base Configuration: 6502 and 6809 CPUs; CP/M; 96K RAM, 36K ROM; integral 12-inch monochrome CRT; integral keyboard/keypad; RS-232C, IEEE-488, and user ports; BASIC 4.0; Waterloo language set; 6809 assembler
Video: 25-line x 80-column text
Important Options: external CBM 2031, 4040, 8050, or 8250 floppy disk drive; CBM 4022, 8023P, or 8300P printer; CBM 8010 modem

Commodore CBM 2001 Series (1978, desktop)
Base Configuration: 6502 CPU, 16K RAM (32K max), integral 12-inch monochrome CRT, integral keyboard/keypad
Video: 25-line x 80-column text

Commodore CBM 8000 Series (1980, desktop)
Base Configuration: 6502 CPU, 32K RAM (96K max), 18K ROM, integral keyboard/keypad, RS-232C and IEEE-488 ports, BASIC 4.0
Video: 25-line x 80-column text
Important Options: external CBM 8062 3.2MB hard disk drive; external CBM 2031, 4040, 8050, or 8250 floppy disk drive; Datasette; CBM 4022, 8023P, or 8300P printer; CBM 8010 modem

Commodore P128 (1982, desktop)
Base Configuration: 1MHz 6509 CPU; ROM cartridge slot; 128K RAM (256K max); 24K ROM; integral keyboard/keypad; RS-232, IEEE-488, user, and cassette ports; three-voice sound
Video: 25-line x 80-column text, 640 x 400 graphics

Commodore B128

The Commodore P128

Commodore B128 (June 1982, desktop)
Base Configuration: 6509 CPU; ROM cartridge slot; 128K RAM (256K max); 40K ROM; monochrome monitor; integral keyboard/keypad; RS-232, IEEE-488, user, and cassette ports; BASIC 4.0, three-voice sound
Video: 25-line x 80-column text, 640 x 400 graphics
Important Options: Z80 coprocessor, CP/M or CP/M-86, UCSD Pascal

Commodore B256 (June 1982, desktop)
Base Configuration: 6509 CPU; ROM cartridge slot; 128K RAM (256K max); 40K ROM; integral monochrome CRT; keyboard/keypad; RS-232, IEEE-488, user, and cassette ports; BASIC 4.0, three-voice sound
Video: 25-line x 80-column text, 640 x 400 graphics
Important Options: Z80 coprocessor, CP/M or CP/M-86, UCSD Pascal

 

Commodore B series

The Commodore B256

Commodore BX128-80 (May 1983, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,695
Base Configuration: 6509 and 8088 CPUs; 128K RAM (960K max), 40K ROM; two 5.25-inch floppy disk drives; integral monochrome CRT; keyboard/keypad; RS-232, IEEE-488, and user ports; BASIC 4.0, three-voice sound
Video: 25-line x 80-column text
Important Options: Z80 coprocessor; UCSD Pascal; CBM 4022, 4023, 6400, 8023, or 8300 printer

Commodore BX256-80 (May 1983, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $2,995
Base Configuration: 6509 and 8088 CPUs; 256K RAM (960K max), 40K ROM; two 5.25-inch floppy disk drives; integral monochrome CRT; keyboard/keypad; RS-232, IEEE-488, and user ports; BASIC 4.0, three-voice sound
Video: 25-line x 80-column text
Important Options: Z80 coprocessor; UCSD Pascal; CBM 4022, 4023, 6400, 8023, or 8300 printerCommodore BX256-80

Commodore BX256-80

Commodore 900 (1985, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $3,000
Base Configuration: 8MHz Z8000 CPU; Coherent; 512K RAM (2MB max); 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; 20MB hard disk drive; 14-inch monochrome monitor; keyboard/keypad; mouse; RS-232C, parallel, and IEEE-488 ports
Video: 25-line x 80-column text
Important Options: second 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, 40MB or 67MB hard disk drive, tape backup, 17-inch monochrome monitor

Commodore VIC-20

Commodore VIC-20

Commodore VIC-20 (1981, home computer)
Original Retail Price: $300
Base Configuration: 6502A CPU, expansion port, 5K RAM (32K max), 16K ROM, integral keyboard, RS-232C and game ports, BASIC in ROM, music synthesizer
Video: 23-line x 22-column text, 176 x 184 graphics, 16 colors
Important Options: external 1540 floppy disk drive, cassette recorder, IEEE-488 interface, 1520 printer/plotter, VIC modem

Commodore 64 (Sept. 1982, home computer)
Original Retail Price: $595
Base Configuration: 6510 CPU, ROM cartridge slot, 64K RAM, 20K ROM, TV video and monitor ports, integral keyboard, RS-232 port, BASIC in ROM, three-channel synthesizer
Video: 25-line x 40-column text, 320 x 200 graphics, 16 colors
Important Options: Z80 coprocessor, CP/M, VIC or 1541 external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, Datasette, IEEE-488 interface, VIC printer, joysticks, VICModem, game controller, light pen

Commodore 64C (1986, home computer)
Base Configuration: 8500 CPU; GEOS; expansion and ROM cartridge ports; 64K RAM, 20K ROM; TV video and monitor ports; integral keyboard; serial, user, and two game ports; BASIC 2.0 in ROM; sound synthesizer
Video: 25-line x 40-column text, 320 x 200 graphics, 16 colors
Size/Weight: 3 x 8 x 16 inches, 4.4 lbs.
Important Options: C1541, C1571, or C1581 external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; C1530 Datasette; C1702 or C1802 monitor; C1350 or C1351 mouse; MPS 801, MPS 802, MPS 803, MPS 1000, or MPS 1200 printer; C1660 or C1670 modem

Commodore 64C

Commodore 64C

Commodore UltiMax (a.k.a. Max Machine, VIC-10) (1983, home computer)
Original Retail Price: $180
Base Configuration: 6510 CPU, Commodore OS, 4K RAM, integral keyboard, RS-232C port, three-voice sound
Video: 25-line x 40-column text, 16 colors
Important Options: Max BASIC

Commodore Executive 64/SX-64 (1983, transportable)
Original Retail Price: $995
Base Configuration: 1.02MHz 6510 CPU, expansion slot, 64K RAM, 20K ROM, 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, integral 5-inch color CRT, composite video port, keyboard, RS-232C and IEEE-488 ports, BASIC 2.0 in ROM, three-channel music/voice synthesizer
Video: 25-line x 40-column text, 320 x 200 graphics, 16 colors
Size/Weight: 5 x 14.5 x 14.5 inches, 27.6 lbs.
Important Options: Z80A coprocessor; CP/M; second 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; PET emulator; MCS 801, MPS 802, or DPS 1101 printer; C1520 printer/plotter; C1312 game controller; C1311 joystick

Commodore Executive 64, or SX-64

Commodore Executive 64, or SX-64

Commodore 264 (early 1984, home computer)
Base Configuration: 1.76MHz 7501 CPU; user expansion slot; 64K RAM; 32K ROM; integral keyboard; serial, two game, parallel, and cassette ports; BASIC 3.5 and monitor software in ROM; AC adapter
Video: 320 x 200 graphics, 16 colors
Size/Weight: 13.25 x 2.5 x 7.75 inches, 3.62 lbs.
Important Options: C1551 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; C1531 Datasette; C1703 color monitor; application suite in ROM; MCS 801, MPS802, DPS 1101, or C1520 printer; joysticks

Commodore 264

Commodore 264

Commodore V364 (Jan. 1984, home computer)
Base Configuration: 1.76MHz 7501 CPU; “user” expansion slot; 64K RAM; 48K ROM; integral keyboard; serial, parallel, cassette, and two game ports; BASIC 3.5 and monitor software in ROM; AC adapter; speech synthesizer
Video: 320 x 200 graphics, 121 colors
Size/Weight: 16.62 x 2.62 x 9.37 inches
Important Options: SFS 481 or C1542 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; C1531 Datasette; C1703 color monitor; MCS 801, MPS802, DPS 1101, or C1520 printer; joysticks

Commodore Plus/4 (1984, home computer)
Original Retail Price: $299
Base Configuration: 7501 CPU; serial bus expansion port; 64K RAM; RF modulator; composite video port; integral keyboard; RS-232, cassette ports and two game ports; Extended BASIC; application suite in ROM; two-channel sound
Video: 25-line x 40-column text, 320 x 200 graphics, 121 colors
Important Options: SFS 481 external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, CM 141 color monitor, MPS 802 or DPS 1101 printer

Commodore Plus/4

Commodore Plus/4

Commodore 16 (1984, home computer)
Base Configuration: 7501 CPU, RF modulator, integral keyboard
Video: 25-line x 40-column text, 320 x 200 graphics, 121 colors
Important Options: 1531 cassette recorder, CM 141 color monitor, MPS 802 printer

Commodore 16

Commodore 16

Commodore 128 (1985, home computer)
Original Retail Price: $400 Base Configuration: 2MHz 8502 and Z80 CPUs; 128K RAM (512K max); TV, RGB, and NTSC video ports; integral keyboard/keypad; serial, user, and game ports
Video: 25-line x 80-column text, 640 x 200 graphics, 16 colors
Important Options: CP/M Plus 3.0, external 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, color monitor

Commodore 128D (1985, home computer)
Base Configuration: 2MHz 8502 and 4MHz Z80A CPUs; ROM cartridge slot; 128K RAM (512K max); 64K ROM; 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; RGB video port; keyboard/keypad; serial, user, cassette, and two game ports
Video: 25-line x 80-column text, 640 x 400 graphics
Important Options: CP/M

Commodore HHC-4 (Jan. 1983, handheld computer)
Original Retail Price: $199
Base Configuration: 4K RAM (16K max); 20K ROM; RS-232, cassette, printer, and video ports; integral 24-character LCD; BASIC in ROM
Size/Weight: 3.5 x 7.7 x 1, 13 oz.

Commodore HHC-4 Handheld Computer

Commodore HHC-4 Handheld Computer

Commodore Amiga 1000 (A1000) (Sept. 1985, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,295
Base Configuration: 7.16MHz 68000 CPU, AmigaDOS, Amiga System Bus slot, 256K RAM (512K max), 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, keyboard/keypad, mouse, RS-232 and parallel ports, Workbench, AmigaBASIC, four-voice sound
Video: 640 x 400 graphics
Size/Weight: 17.75 x 13 x 14.25 inches, 13 lbs.
Important Options: PC-compatiblity upgrade

Commodore Amiga 500 (A500) (1987, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $649
Base Configuration: 7.16MHz 68000 CPU, AmigaDOS 1.2, Amiga System Bus slot, 512K RAM (1MB max), 3.5-inch floppy disk drive, integral keyboard/keypad, mouse, RS-232 and parallel ports, Workbench, AmigaBASIC, four-voice sound
Video: 640 x 400 graphics
Size/Weight: 18.25 x 12.62 x 2.25 inches, 7.5 lbs.

Commodore Amiga 1000, Amiga 2000, Amiga 500

From left to right, Commodore Amiga 1000, Amiga 2000, Amiga 500

Commodore Amiga 2000 (A2000) (1987, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,499
Base Configuration: 7.16MHz 68000 CPU; AmigaDOS 1.2 with Workbench; three Amiga System Bus, two ISA slots, and two Amiga/ISA slots; 1MB RAM (9MB max); 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; keyboard/keypad; mouse; RS-232 and parallel ports; AmigaBASIC; four-voice sound
Video: 640 x 400 graphics
Size/Weight: 17.37 x 15.27 x 6 inches, 22.5 lbs.
Important Options: MS-DOS, A2630 accelerator, Bridgeboard PC/XT add-on

Commodore Amiga 2000HD (A2000HD) (1989, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $1,499
Base Configuration: 7.13MHz 68000 CPU; AmigaDOS 1.2 with Workbench; three Amiga System Bus, two ISA slots, and four Amiga/ISA slots; 1MB RAM (9MB max); 256K ROM; 880K 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; 40MB hard disk drive; 94-key keyboard/keypad; mouse; RS-232, parallel, two mouse/light pen, color video, and monochrome video ports; AmigaBASIC; four-voice, two channel sound, 22oW power supply
Video: 640 x 480 graphics, 80 characters x 25 lines, 4,096 colors
Size/Weight: 17.37 x 15.27 x 6 inches, 25 lbs.
Important Options: MS-DOS, A2630 accelerator, Bridgeboard PC/XT add-on, 5.25-inch internal floppy disk drive, external Amiga A1010 floppy disk drives

Commodore Amiga 2000HD

Commodore Amiga 2000HD

Commodore Amiga 2500/20 (A2500/20) (1988, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $4,699
Base Configuration: 14.3MHz 68020 CPU; AmigaDOS; five Amiga System Bus and four ISA slots; 2MB RAM; 3.5MB floppy disk drive; 40MB hard disk drive; SCSI, RS-232, and parallel ports
Video: 640 x 400 graphics
Important Options: MS-DOS, video accelerator, Unix System V Release 4

Commodore Amiga 2500/30 (A2500/30) (1988, desktop)
Base Configuration: 25MHz 68030 CPU; AmigaDOS; five Amiga System Bus and four ISA slots; 2MB RAM; 3.5MB floppy disk drive; 40MB hard disk drive; SCSI, RS-232, and parallel ports
Video: 640 x 400 graphics
Important Options: MS-DOS, video accelerator, Unix System V Release 4

Commodore Amiga 2500-30

Commodore Amiga 2500/30

Commodore Amiga 3000 (A3000) (July 1990, desktop)
Original Retail Price: $3,299 to $4,499
Base Configuration: 16MHz or 25MHz 68030 CPU; AmigaDOS 2.0; Amiga System Bus; four Zorro III and two ISA slots; 1MB RAM (2MB plus16MB Fast RAM max); 512K ROM; 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; 40MB hard disk drive; keyboard/keypad; mouse; SCSI, RS-232, and parallel ports; AREXX; speech recognition
Video: 1280 x 400 graphics, VGA
Size/Weight: 15.5 x 14.5 x 4.75 inches, 20 lbs.
Important Options: 100MB hard disk drive, 2024 monochrome or 1950 color monitor, AmigaVision authoring system, Amiga 10 speakers

Commodore Amiga 3000

Commodore Amiga 3000

Commodore Amiga 4000 (A4000) (1992, desktop)
Base Configuration: 25MHz 68040 CPU; AmigaOS 3.0; four Zorro and three IDE slots; 2MB RAM and 4MB Fast RAM (16MB Fast RAM max); 512K ROM; 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; or 120MB hard disk drive; RGB video port; keyboard/keypad; mouse; serial, parallel, and two game ports; four-voice sound
Video: 256,000 colors
Size/Weight: 15.25 x 15 x 5 inches, 20 lbs.

Commodore Amiga 1200 (A1200) (1992, desktop)
Base Configuration: 14MHz 68020 CPU; AmigaOS 3.0; PCMCIA slot; 2MB RAM (8MB max); 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; RGB and composite video ports; keyboard/keypad; mouse; RS-232C, parallel, and game ports; AC adapter
Video: 1280 x 512 graphics, 256 colors
Size/Weight: 19.1 x 9.75 x 2.7 inches
Important Options: 170MB hard disk drive

Amiga 600 (1992, home computer)
Base Configuration: 7.16MHz 68000 CPU; 1MB RAM (2MB plus 6MB Fast RAM max); AmigaDOS 2 in ROM; PCMCIA slot; 3.5-inch floppy disk drive; RGB and composite video ports; integral keyboard; mouse; RS-232C, parallel, and two game/mouse ports; four-voice sound
Size/Weight: 14 x 9.5 x 3 inches, 6 lbs.
Important Options: 40MB hard disk drive

Commodore Amiga CDTV (1991, multimedia console)
Base Configuration: 68000 CPU; 1MB RAM; 512K ROM; 540MB CD-ROM drive; serial, parallel, two audio, and MIDI in/out ports; floppy disk interface; infrared remote
Video: 640- x 400-pixel graphics, 16 colors
Size/Weight: 17.25″w x 12.6″d x 3.7″h

Commodore Amiga CDTV

Commodore Amiga CDTV

Commodore PC10-1 (1986, PC)
Base Configuration: 4.77MHz 8088 CPU, 512K RAM (640K max), MS-DOS and GW BASIC 3.2, five slots, 360K DS DD 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, RS-232 and parallel ports, keyboard
Video: CGA, MDA, Hercules, and Plantronics

Commodore PC10-1 and PC10-2 PC clones

Commodore PC10-1 and PC10-2

Commodore PC10-2 (1986, PC)
Base Configuration: 4.77MHz 8088 CPU, 640K RAM, MS-DOS and GW BASIC 3.2, five slots, two 360K DS DD 5.25-inch floppy disk drives, RS-232 and parallel ports, keyboard
Video: CGA, MDA, Hercules, and Plantronics

Commodore PC40-III (1989, PC)
Base Configuration: 12MHz 80286 CPU; 1MB RAM (16MB max); MS-DOS and GW BASIC; three AT slots and one XT slot; 1.2MB 5.25-inch floppy disk drive; 40MB hard disk drive; RS-232C, parallel, and mouse ports; keyboard/keypad; 112W power supply
Video: VGA, EGA, CGA, Hercules, and MDA
Size/Weight: 15.5″d x 14″w x 5.6″h, 21.9 lbs.
Important Options: 3.5-inch floppy disk drive

Commodore PC40-III

Commodore PC40-III

Commodore Colt (April 1988, PC)
Original Retail Price: $895.95
Base Configuration: 7.16MHz 8088 CPU; 640K RAM; MS-DOS 3.2 and GW BASIC; three XT slots; two 360K 5.25-inch floppy disk drives; serial, parallel, video, and mouse ports; keyboard; clock/calendar; Wordstar/Colt
Video: CGA, MDA, Hercules, and Plantronics Color Plus

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